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  #1  
Old 12-22-2005, 12:57 PM
Guy Incognito Guy Incognito is offline
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Default Krav Maga

So I went to the local martial arts academy to get some info about classes, and the guy asks me what I'm looking to gain, and I say something practical for self-defense purposes that will also get me into shape, and he suggests Krav Maga. Any of you martial arts nuts have an opinion on this? For those that don't know, here's the link to the official site:

http://kravmaga.com/
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  #2  
Old 12-22-2005, 01:05 PM
Blarg Blarg is offline
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Default Re: Krav Maga

Any style is good if the instructor and student are good. This one is incredibly hyped in a way that can get a bit nauseating sometimes, but it has its good practicioners and students too.

See if you get a good vibe from the instructor and students. An instructor who doesn't keep his students respectful and demands nothing more out of them than a check is your ticket to injury and a miserable time. A good instructor who helps establish camraderie in his class and holds people accountable for not being jerks is a great thing.

Never join a class before you've had a chance to watch at least one full class. Watching for an hour is crap; anyone can make a class not look crummy for an hour, especially to an inexperienced student. An instructor who doesn't want you to watch before you pay, or wants you to watch only a very little bit, is sending off a warning sign a thousand feet high -- STAY AWAY.

A good one will want you to be comfortable with how things look before you join, and is not so interested in your money that he's more interested in it than you. P.S. this description unfortunately doesn't fit many instructors, even ones who are quite good physically. Being a good teacher is about a lot more than being Mr. Macho or physically accomplished.

Ideally you should not give yourself just one choice, either. It's usual to see a class and get excited and then join up right away. You might think you couldn't be more thrilled after something you see. But going to several different classes to see several teachers will give you an idea where you want to commit to. Because martial arts is a very long term commitment if you actually want to learn the style.

I know that advice won't be followed, but it's the smart thing to do. Don't make commitments too hastily. Look around. You could find many things that interest you, but some will interest you more. So leaping on the first good thing is kind of dumb.
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  #3  
Old 12-22-2005, 01:25 PM
TheBlueMonster TheBlueMonster is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: MD
Posts: 24
Default Re: Krav Maga

[ QUOTE ]
Any style is good if the instructor and student are good. This one is incredibly hyped in a way that can get a bit nauseating sometimes, but it has its good practicioners and students too.

See if you get a good vibe from the instructor and students. An instructor who doesn't keep his students respectful and demands nothing more out of them than a check is your ticket to injury and a miserable time. A good instructor who helps establish camraderie in his class and holds people accountable for not being jerks is a great thing.

Never join a class before you've had a chance to watch at least one full class. Watching for an hour is crap; anyone can make a class not look crummy for an hour, especially to an inexperienced student. An instructor who doesn't want you to watch before you pay, or wants you to watch only a very little bit, is sending off a warning sign a thousand feet high -- STAY AWAY.

A good one will want you to be comfortable with how things look before you join, and is not so interested in your money that he's more interested in it than you. P.S. this description unfortunately doesn't fit many instructors, even ones who are quite good physically. Being a good teacher is about a lot more than being Mr. Macho or physically accomplished.

Ideally you should not give yourself just one choice, either. It's usual to see a class and get excited and then join up right away. You might think you couldn't be more thrilled after something you see. But going to several different classes to see several teachers will give you an idea where you want to commit to. Because martial arts is a very long term commitment if you actually want to learn the style.

I know that advice won't be followed, but it's the smart thing to do. Don't make commitments too hastily. Look around. You could find many things that interest you, but some will interest you more. So leaping on the first good thing is kind of dumb.

[/ QUOTE ]
I agree completely. I'd personally learn Kung Fu, but Krav Maga is a pretty badass martial arts form.
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  #4  
Old 12-22-2005, 01:26 PM
diebitter diebitter is offline
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Default Re: Krav Maga

Wing Chun will definitely help you look after yourself in a very short time.
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  #5  
Old 12-22-2005, 02:01 PM
Guy Incognito Guy Incognito is offline
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Default Re: Krav Maga

Thanks for the input. I'm going to watch one of the classes tonight.

The reason I picked this particular place is its convenience to home/work, and they only offer Krav Maga and Taekwondo. So if I wanted any other option I'd have to do a lot of driving, and might not have time to make all the classes.
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  #6  
Old 12-22-2005, 02:03 PM
HDPM HDPM is offline
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Default Re: Krav Maga

I tried a little krav maga and thought it was pretty good. Didn't stay with it for a variety of reasons, mostly because it isn't available where I am. It will get you in shape. I am not in shape and it kicked my butt. I think it is more practical than a lot of stuff out there, although I am not a martial arts guy. I am leery of specialized arts that neglect areas of fighting, but integrated practical combatives training isn't all that available, at least where I am. IMO to be practical you need something that incorporates everything. Krav Maga at least talks about some weapons related stuff, but I don't know if all their instructors are skilled in that. At least the one I went to wasn't. Then again, as I said I am not a martial arts guy and about anything I did would be better than what I do, LOL. Anyway, I think KM is better for practicality than some other stuff you will find, as it tries to stay practical and avoid rankings and stuff. And the workout itself is tough.
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  #7  
Old 12-22-2005, 02:04 PM
HDPM HDPM is offline
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Default Re: Krav Maga

[ QUOTE ]
Thanks for the input. I'm going to watch one of the classes tonight.

The reason I picked this particular place is its convenience to home/work, and they only offer Krav Maga and Taekwondo. So if I wanted any other option I'd have to do a lot of driving, and might not have time to make all the classes.

[/ QUOTE ]


To sort of add to my post above, between KM and taekwondo I would take KM.
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  #8  
Old 12-22-2005, 03:45 PM
Martin Martin is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2004
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Default Re: Krav Maga

Krav isn't bad but like Blarg said the instructor makes or breaks the art. Check his credentials and teaching experience first. Between Krav and TKD I would go with Krav, if you are looking for a practical Martial Art, if however you want to compete then TKD will give you plenty competion.
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