Two Plus Two Older Archives  

Go Back   Two Plus Two Older Archives > 2+2 Communities > Other Other Topics

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 12-20-2005, 05:58 PM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Improving my chess game

Get yourself ICC (http://www.chessclub.com/), and just do trainingbot over and over. Play in leagues such as the 45/45 team league, sunday slow tournaments etc. Simuls against international and grandmaster players almost every day.

There's plenty of opportunitys for slow games and lots of tools for improvement. Also for some amusing poker discussion join channel 41 and listen to those guys talk about poker. It's interesting to see fish talk strategy.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-20-2005, 06:02 PM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Improving my chess game

[ QUOTE ]
I am familiar with de la Maza's study plan. I don't particularly like it and don't recommend it. It worked well for him, but anyone with the discipline to study the same number of hours as de la Maza did would probably get a benefit regardless of what they studied.

[/ QUOTE ]

Disagree. The crux of de la Maza's plan is studying tactics, which gets much more bang for the buck than studying opening theory or rare endgames.

Also recommend this article, by NM Heisman:

An Improvement Plan - Dan Heisman

Welcome to chess, the inconstant lover [img]/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] GL with your studies.

ScottieK
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-20-2005, 06:56 PM
atrifix atrifix is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 13
Default Re: Improving my chess game

[ QUOTE ]
Disagree. The crux of de la Maza's plan is studying tactics, which gets much more bang for the buck than studying opening theory or rare endgames.

[/ QUOTE ]
I think studying tactics is good for developing pattern recognition skills, but it's only one piece of a rounded study program. Not that people should memorize MCO, but training yourself to do 1000 problems a day and think like a finite state automoton probably contributes less to your game than understanding how to play rook endings. Just IMHO, of course. To each his own.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-20-2005, 06:58 PM
gumpzilla gumpzilla is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,401
Default Re: Improving my chess game

Basic endgames are probably the thing other than tactics that a lot of people would benefit from studying some. They're definitely less flashy than learning cool sounding opening variations, so they don't really get the love. But, if you suck tactically, the likelihood of getting to an endgame that's going to require some theoretical knowledge is somewhat lower, so it seems tactics should still be boss. I'm only a rather casual player, though, so take my comments with a grain of salt.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12-20-2005, 07:18 PM
Skipbidder Skipbidder is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Illinois
Posts: 415
Default Re: Improving my chess game

Learn endgames. It doesn't help you to win a pawn with your superior middlegame play and then not be able to convert the win.

Grab a book on tactics and leave it in the bathroom.

Don't get too hung up on openings.

Play lots of chess.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12-20-2005, 07:24 PM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Improving my chess game

[ QUOTE ]
Basic endgames are probably the thing other than tactics that a lot of people would benefit from studying some. They're definitely less flashy than learning cool sounding opening variations, so they don't really get the love. But, if you suck tactically, the likelihood of getting to an endgame that's going to require some theoretical knowledge is somewhat lower, so it seems tactics should still be boss. I'm only a rather casual player, though, so take my comments with a grain of salt.

[/ QUOTE ]

[ QUOTE ]
I think studying tactics is good for developing pattern recognition skills, but it's only one piece of a rounded study program. Not that people should memorize MCO, but training yourself to do 1000 problems a day and think like a finite state automoton probably contributes less to your game than understanding how to play rook endings. Just IMHO, of course. To each his own.

[/ QUOTE ]

Yes, endgames are important as well. Basic endgames (K&Q/R vs K, K&P vs K, some others) are essential. Nothing breaks my heart more than seeing kids with K and Q unable to mate a lone K. I see it every year at a scholastic tournament I direct, and it's one of the first things I teach my students.

R&P endgames get more important as you go up the rating ladder, but I've never had to prove Lucena or Philidor's over the board. The ideas behind them have come in handy now and again though.

You don't need to do 1000 problems a day. If you're serious, 30 minutes a day of pattern recognition and reinforcement with a problems book should be sufficient (which reminds me, I'm rusty.) The goal is to learn and eventually memorize a basic pattern and be able to recognize it in a game position almost immediately. It's much more reliable than calculating "from scratch," but that ability comes in handy as well (especially when calculating combinations that involve several tactical themes.)

De la Maza's plan is tactics-heavy...that's why I like Heisman's plan better. It's more comprehensive and user-friendly.

ScottieK
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.