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Old 10-13-2005, 04:31 PM
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Default Organized Religion as a Tradition

The one thing that I find interesting is how degree of faith seems to be inverely correlated to socioeconomical status, quality of life, and intelligence.

In Central America the vast majority of people believe in god. In the poorer southern states a higher percntage of people believe in god than in the northeastern states. More people in eastern Europe believe in god than in western Europe. Of course there are exceptions, but there is a definite trend.

It almost seems like believing in god is a way to rationalize or make some sense of the fact that you have been dealt a crappy hand in life. The fact that "heaven" awaits is very comforting when dealing with all of life's miseries and bad things that happen to human beings.

When I visited my relatives in Poland this past summer, I spoke to a few of them about Catholicism and belief in god.
Only two of them said that they didn't believe in god, and they both just thought that religion was a "tradition" passed on within the Polish culture just like good food and vodka. One of these relatives was a doctor and the other an engineer. In fact I was surprised that they admitted to being atheist, but I think it was easier to do it to me rather than other members of the family that they see on a regular basis.

I really think that belief in a particular god is passed on from generation to generation in particular cultures as if it where a fact not open to discussion. It's almost like poor people having children who become poor, etc. Muslims raise Muslims, Sikhs raise Sikhs, etc.

I'm probably insulting the theists that will be reading this, but that's how I see the whole "faith" thing.
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Old 10-13-2005, 04:36 PM
spaminator101 spaminator101 is offline
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Default Re: Organized Religion as a Tradition

Christianity is not a trend from a reformed point of veiw. However an argument can be stated that other religions are.
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Old 10-13-2005, 05:03 PM
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Default Re: Organized Religion as a Tradition

The United States is the richest country in the world, but by far it is more religious than Europe. That said, I kind of agree with you.
Relgion is a fantastic crutch for those who need one, and wonderful supplement for those who don't need one (as well as a complete burden on the the rest of us). I believe that the poorer you are the more you need some kind of crutch, so that's where I think the trend comes from. People like me who need a crutch but are non-religious find something else. Like poker and vodka.
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Old 10-13-2005, 05:19 PM
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Default Re: Organized Religion as a Tradition

[ QUOTE ]
People like me who need a crutch but are non-religious find something else. Like poker and vodka.

[/ QUOTE ]


I think we would get along very well. [img]/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]
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Old 10-13-2005, 05:25 PM
purnell purnell is offline
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Default Re: Organized Religion as a Tradition

There appears to be a genetic factor as well.

web page
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Old 10-13-2005, 05:39 PM
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Default Re: Organized Religion as a Tradition

Here's a Richard Dawkins quote from that article. Once I started reading Dawkins, any tiny shred of theism within me was very quickly vanquished.


"Religious behaviour in bipedal apes occupies large quantities of time. It devours huge resources. A medieval cathedral consumed hundreds of man-centuries in its building. Sacred music and devotional paintings largely monopolised medieval and Renaissance talent. Thousands, perhaps millions, of people have died, often accepting torture first, for loyalty to one religion against a scarcely distinguishable alternative. Devout people have died for their gods, killed for them, fasted for them, endured whipping, undertaken a lifetime of celibacy, and sworn themselves to asocial silence for the sake of religion."
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Old 10-13-2005, 10:41 PM
benkahuna benkahuna is offline
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Default Re: Organized Religion as a Tradition

People with a strong sense of faith are, on average happier and healthier than those without it.
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Old 10-14-2005, 11:15 AM
RJT RJT is offline
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Default Re: Organized Religion as a Tradition

Along the same lines: It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter heaven.

The same analogy can be said of those more intelligent or “sophisticated” to the ways of the world.

My post is not meant as an answer, only to point out that your OP has been discussed a couple of thousand years ago. Your question is the same. The responses do not differ today.
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Old 10-14-2005, 04:41 PM
RJT RJT is offline
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Default Re: Organized Religion as a Tradition

[ QUOTE ]
Here's a Richard Dawkins quote from that article. Once I started reading Dawkins, any tiny shred of theism within me was very quickly vanquished.


"Religious behaviour in bipedal apes occupies large quantities of time. It devours huge resources. A medieval cathedral consumed hundreds of man-centuries in its building. Sacred music and devotional paintings largely monopolised medieval and Renaissance talent. Thousands, perhaps millions, of people have died, often accepting torture first, for loyalty to one religion against a scarcely distinguishable alternative. Devout people have died for their gods, killed for them, fasted for them, endured whipping, undertaken a lifetime of celibacy, and sworn themselves to asocial silence for the sake of religion."

[/ QUOTE ]

Does Dawkins go on to give his opinion on why time is better spent in/with other endeavors? I caught a bit of a TV interview with him - and his main worry in general seems to be is "if something causes pain to someone". Is that his "Absolute"? And if so, does he say why he gives it such and esteemed place in his thinking?
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Old 10-14-2005, 08:10 PM
spaminator101 spaminator101 is offline
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Default Another and very probable view

Another post-


After God scattered the peoples and confused the languages after the Tower of Babble, people wound up everywhere. Jesus was born in Bethlehem- the middle east. This put a strong Christian Church in the Middle East, Ethiopia, and some parts of Europe. The gospel was not spread to other places.
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