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  #1  
Old 12-20-2005, 05:25 PM
thatpfunk thatpfunk is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9
Default My netller account was hacked (virus question)

Last week I hadn't used neteller for a few days. On friday evening I attempted to log in and it said my account had been closed due to security reasons.

I give them a call today and start talking to security personel. They ask me about the last transaction I can remember. I tell them and they ask if I remember depositing $1000 with a credit card last Wed. I tell them no. They ask me for the last 4 digits of my CC. It doesn't match.

They explain that most likely my account was hacked using a virus that tracked my keystrokes. The credit card used to deposit was stolen but they were not able to make any merchant purchases before the account was frozen.

The security guy explains that most likely it was a variation of a virus called MYTOB. Now, keep in mind, I have a 2 week old laptop with all the current virus-stuff, firewlls, etc.

I am honestly pretty freaked right now. I did not think this could happen so easily. I'm at a loss for words. I do not want to open up another neteller. If anyone has any info about the virus or something like this, please give me as much info as possible, I will update when my head is more clear.
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  #2  
Old 12-20-2005, 05:35 PM
Wynton Wynton is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 18
Default Re: My netller account was hacked (virus question)

I just read here about someone else who felt he had been defrauded somehow in his Neteller account. You might be interested.
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  #3  
Old 12-20-2005, 05:37 PM
GrannyMae GrannyMae is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 3,449
Default Re: My netller account was hacked (virus question)

Distribution

Subject of email: Varies
Name of attachment: Varies.
Size of attachment: 42,512 bytes
Time stamp of attachment: n/a
Ports: Various TCP ports.
Shared drives: n/a
Target of infection: n/a
When W32.Mytob@mm runs, it does the following:


Copies itself to the %System% folder. Some variants may have the following file name:

%System%\msnmsgr.exe.

Note: %System% is a variable. The worm locates the System folder and copies itself to that location. By default, this is C:\Windows\System (Windows 95/98/Me), C:\Winnt\System32 (Windows NT/2000), or C:\Windows\System32 (Windows XP).


May create and share a folder on the [censored] file-sharing network, by adding the following registry value:

"dir0" = "012345:[CONFIGURABLE PATH]"

to the registry subkey:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\[censored]\LocalContent


Copies itself to the configured path as file names that are designed to trick other users into downloading and executing the worm.


May perform Denial of Service attacks on specified servers.


May end security application processes.


Connects to specified IRC servers and joins a channel to receive commands. The commands may include the following:


Scan for vulnerable computers
Download or upload files
List or end running processes
Steal cached passwords
Log keystrokes to steal information entered into windows with titles containing the following strings:


bank
login
e-bay
ebay
paypal

Start a local HTTP, FTP, or TFTP server
Search for files on the compromised computer
Capture screenshots, data from the clipboard, and footage from webcams
Visit URLs
Flush the DNS and ARP caches
Open a command shell on the compromised computer
Intercept packets on the local area network
Send net send messages
Copy itself to many hard-coded Windows startup folders, such as the following:


Documents and Settings\All Users\Menu Start\Programma's\Opstarten
WINDOWS\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\StartUp
WINNT\Profiles\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup
WINDOWS\Start Menu\Programs\Startup
Documenti e Impostazioni\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup
Dokumente und Einstellungen\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup
Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

Note: Symantec Security Response has received reports of variants of this worm creating zero-byte files in the Startup folder. These files may have file names such as TFTP780 or TFTP###, where # can be any number


Adds a variable registry value to one or more of the following registry subkeys:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\Run
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\
RunOnce
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\
RunServices
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\Run
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\
RunServices
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\
RunOnce
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\OLE

For example:

"MSN" = "msnmsgr.exe"


May create a random subkey with random values under the following subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE


May create a random subkey under the following subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\CLSID


May modify one of the following values:

"EnableDCOM" = "Y"
"EnableDCOM" = "N"

in the registry subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\OLE

which enables or disables DCOM settings, depending on the command from the attacker.


May modify the value:

"restrictanonymous" = "1"

in the registry subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Contro l\Lsa

to restrict network access.


May modify the value:

"Start" = "4"

in the registry subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\SharedAccess

to disable the SharedAccess service in Windows 2000/XP.


May modify the values:

"AutoShareWks" = "0"
"AutoShareServer" = "0"

in the registry subkeys:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\lanmanserver\
parameters
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\lanmanworkstation\
parameters


May modify the value:

"DoNotAllowXPSP2" = "1"

in the registry subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Win dows\WindowsUpdate

to prevent Windows XP SP2 from being installed on the compromised computer.


May send confidential information, such as the operating system, IP address, user name, etc., to the IRC server.


May open a back door on a random port.


May register itself as a service.


May drop a device driver file named %System%\haxdrv.sys.


May start proxy server for HTTP, SOCKS4, or SMTP protocol.


May port scan the network.


May attempt to connect to MS SQL servers with weak Administrator or SA passwords, and copy itself to the computer if successful. The following passwords could be applied in an attempt to authenticate to the remote server:


null
Rendszergazda
Beheerder
amministratore
hallintovirkailijat
Administrat
Administrateur
administrador
Administrador
administrator
Administrator
ADMINISTRATOR
Password
password
admin
123


May be able to enumerate through accounts on the computer and disable the "SeNetworkLogonRight" Authorization Constant to explicitly deny an account the right to log on using the network log on type.


May attempt to enumerate users in order to copy itself to network shares. The following passwords could be applied in an attempt to authenticate to the remote share:


007
123
1234
12345
123456
1234567
12345678
123456789
1234567890
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
access
accounting
accounts
adm
administrador
administrat
administrateur
administrator
admins
amministratore
asd
backup
beheerder
bill
bitch
blank
bob
brian
changeme
chris
cisco
compaq
computer
control
data
database
databasepass
databasepassword
db1
db1234
db2
dba
dbpass
dbpassword
default
dell
demo
domain
domainpass
domainpassword
eric
exchange
fred
[censored]
george
god
guest
hallintovirikailijat
hell
hello
home
homeuser
ian
ibm
internet
intranet
jen
joe
john
kate
katie
lan
lee
linux
login
loginpass
luke
mail
main
mary
mike
neil
nokia
none
null
oem
oeminstall
oemuser
office
oracle
orainstall
outlook
owner
pass
pass1234
passwd
password
password1
peter
pwd
qaz
qwe
qwerty
rendszergazda
sam
server
sex
siemens
[censored]
sql
sqlpassoainstall
staff
student
sue
susan
system
teacher
technical
test
unix
user
web
win2000
win2k
win98
windows
winnt
winpass
winxp
www
wwwadmin
zxc

Note: This step may result in user accounts being locked out due to multiple failed authentication attempts.


May spread by exploiting the following vulnerabilities:


The DCOM RPC Vulnerability (described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS03-026) using TCP port 135.
The LSASS vulnerability (described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS04-011) using TCP ports 135, 139 or 445.
The vulnerabilities in the Microsoft SQL Server 2000 or MSDE 2000 audit (described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS02-061) using UDP port 1434.
The WebDav Vulnerability (described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS03-007) using TCP port 80.
The UPnP NOTIFY Buffer Overflow Vulnerability (described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS01-059).
The Workstation Service Buffer Overrun Vulnerability (described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS03-049) using TCP port 445. Windows XP users are protected against this vulnerability if the patch in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS03-043 has been applied. Windows 2000 users must apply the patch in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS03-049.
The Microsoft Windows SSL Library Denial of Service Vulnerability (described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS04-011).
The VERITAS Backup Exec Agent Browser Remote Buffer Overflow Vulnerability (as described here).
The Microsoft Windows Plug and Play Buffer Overflow Vulnerability (described in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS05-039).


May download and execute remote files, including updates of the worm.


May check if it is running under the context of a debugger or VMWare. The worm terminates immediately if this is the case.


May drop Hacktool.Rootkit to hide the worm from the process list.


Searches for the email addresses in files that have the following extensions:


.wab
.adb
.tbb
.dbx
.asp
.php
.sht
.htm

The worm avoids sending itself to email addresses containing the following strings:


.edu
.gov
.mil
accoun
acketst
admin
anyone
arin.
avp
be_loyal
berkeley
borlan
bsd
bugs
certific
contact
example
feste
fido
foo.
fsf.
gnu
gold-certs
google
gov.
help
hotmail
iana
ibm.com
icrosof
icrosoft
ietf
info
inpris
isc.o
isi.e
kernel
linux
listserv
math
mit.e
mozilla
msn.
mydomai
nobody
nodomai
noone
not
nothing
ntivi
page
panda
pgp
postmaster
privacy
rating
rfc-ed
ripe.
root
ruslis
samples
secur
sendmail
service
site
soft
somebody
someone
sopho
submit
support
syma
tanford.e
the.bat
unix
usenet
utgers.ed
webmaster
you
your


Attempts to send a copy of itself via email using its own SMTP engine. The email may have the following characteristics:

From: Spoofed

Subject:
One of the following:


hello
hi
error
status
test
Mail Transaction Failed
Mail Delivery System
SERVER REPORT
(No Subject)
(random alphabets)


Message:
One of the following:
The message cannot be represented in 7-bit ASCII encoding and has been sent as a binary attachment.
Mail transaction failed. Partial message is available.
test
The message contains Unicode characters and has been sent as a binary attachment.
(No body)
(Random data)


Attachment:
May contain one of the following:


body
data
doc
document
file
message
readme
test
(random alphabets)

with one of the following extensions:


.bat
.cmd
.exe
.pif
.scr
.zip

If the attachment is a .zip file, a copy of the worm will have a second extension, which will be one of the following:


.doc
.txt
.htm
.html






Symantec Security Response encourages all users and administrators to adhere to the following basic security "best practices":

Turn off and remove unneeded services. By default, many operating systems install auxiliary services that are not critical, such as an FTP server, telnet, and a Web server. These services are avenues of attack. If they are removed, blended threats have less avenues of attack and you have fewer services to maintain through patch updates.
If a blended threat exploits one or more network services, disable, or block access to, those services until a patch is applied.
Always keep your patch levels up-to-date, especially on computers that host public services and are accessible through the firewall, such as HTTP, FTP, mail, and DNS services (for example, all Windows-based computers should have the current Service Pack installed.). Additionally, please apply any security updates that are mentioned in this writeup, in trusted Security Bulletins, or on vendor Web sites.
Enforce a password policy. Complex passwords make it difficult to crack password files on compromised computers. This helps to prevent or limit damage when a computer is compromised.
Configure your email server to block or remove email that contains file attachments that are commonly used to spread viruses, such as .vbs, .bat, .exe, .pif and .scr files.
Isolate infected computers quickly to prevent further compromising your organization. Perform a forensic analysis and restore the computers using trusted media.
Train employees not to open attachments unless they are expecting them. Also, do not execute software that is downloaded from the Internet unless it has been scanned for viruses. Simply visiting a compromised Web site can cause infection if certain browser vulnerabilities are not patched.


Removal using the W32.Mytob@mm Removal Tool
Symantec Security Response has developed a removal tool to clean the infections of W32.Mytob@mm. Use this removal tool first, as it is the easiest way to remove this threat.

Manual Removal:
The following instructions pertain to all current and recent Symantec antivirus products, including the Symantec AntiVirus and Norton AntiVirus product lines.


Disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP).
Update the virus definitions.
Run a full system scan, and delete all files detected.
Delete the value that was added to the registry.
Reenable the SharedAccess service (Windows 2000/XP only)

For specific details on each of these steps, read the following instructions.

1. To disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP)
If you are running Windows Me or Windows XP, we recommend that you temporarily turn off System Restore. Windows Me/XP uses this feature, which is enabled by default, to restore the files on your computer in case they become damaged. If a virus, worm, or Trojan infects a computer, System Restore may back up the virus, worm, or Trojan on the computer.

Windows prevents outside programs, including antivirus programs, from modifying System Restore. Therefore, antivirus programs or tools cannot remove threats in the System Restore folder. As a result, System Restore has the potential of restoring an infected file on your computer, even after you have cleaned the infected files from all the other locations.

Also, a virus scan may detect a threat in the System Restore folder even though you have removed the threat.

For instructions on how to turn off System Restore, read your Windows documentation, or one of the following articles:
How to disable or enable Windows Me System Restore
How to turn off or turn on Windows XP System Restore

Note: When you are completely finished with the removal procedure and are satisfied that the threat has been removed, reenable System Restore by following the instructions in the aforementioned documents.

For additional information, and an alternative to disabling Windows Me System Restore, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article: Antivirus Tools Cannot Clean Infected Files in the _Restore Folder (Article ID: Q263455).

2. To update the virus definitions
Symantec Security Response fully tests all the virus definitions for quality assurance before they are posted to our servers. There are two ways to obtain the most recent virus definitions:
Running LiveUpdate, which is the easiest way to obtain virus definitions: These virus definitions are posted to the LiveUpdate servers once each week (usually on Wednesdays), unless there is a major virus outbreak. To determine whether definitions for this threat are available by LiveUpdate, refer to Virus Definitions (LiveUpdate).
Downloading the definitions using the Intelligent Updater: The Intelligent Updater virus definitions are posted daily. You should download the definitions from the Symantec Security Response Web site and manually install them. To determine whether definitions for this threat are available by the Intelligent Updater, refer to Virus Definitions (Intelligent Updater).

The latest Intelligent Updater virus definitions can be obtained here: Intelligent Updater virus definitions. For detailed instructions read the document: How to update virus definition files using the Intelligent Updater.


3. To scan for and delete the infected files
Start your Symantec antivirus program and make sure that it is configured to scan all the files.
For Norton AntiVirus consumer products: Read the document: How to configure Norton AntiVirus to scan all files.
For Symantec AntiVirus Enterprise products: Read the document: How to verify that a Symantec Corporate antivirus product is set to scan all files.
Run a full system scan.
Note any files detected, click Delete.

Important: If you are unable to start your Symantec antivirus product or the product reports that it cannot delete a detected file, you may need to stop the risk from running in order to remove it. To do this, run the scan in Safe mode. For instructions, read the document, How to start the computer in Safe Mode. Once you have restarted in Safe mode, run the scan again.

After the files are deleted, restart the computer in Normal mode and proceed with the next section.

Warning messages may be displayed when the computer is restarted, since the threat may not be fully removed at this point. You can ignore these messages and click OK. These messages will not appear when the computer is restarted after the removal instructions have been fully completed. The messages displayed may be similar to the following:

Title: [FILE PATH]
Message body: Windows cannot find [FILE NAME]. Make sure you typed the name correctly, and then try again. To search for a file, click the Start button, and then click Search.


4. To delete the value from the registry
Important: Symantec strongly recommends that you back up the registry before making any changes to it. Incorrect changes to the registry can result in permanent data loss or corrupted files. Modify the specified subkeys only. For instructions refer to the document: How to make a backup of the Windows registry.

Click Start > Run.
Type regedit
Click OK.

Note: If the registry editor fails to open the threat may have modified the registry to prevent access to the registry editor. Security Response has developed a tool to resolve this problem. Download and run this tool, and then continue with the removal.


Navigate to the following subkeys:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\Run
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\
RunOnce
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\
RunServices
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\Run
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\
RunServices
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\
RunOnce
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\OLE


In the right pane, delete any values that refer to the file names that were detected.


Navigate to the subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\SharedAccess


In the right pane, reset the original value, if known:

"Start" = "4"


Navigate to the subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Contro l\Lsa


In the right pane, reset the original value, if known:

"restrictanonymous" = "1"


Navigate to the subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\lanmanserver\
parameters
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\lanmanworkstation\
parameters


In the right pane, reset the original values, if known:

"AutoShareWks" = "0"
"AutoShareServer" = "0"


Navigate to the subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Win dows\WindowsUpdate


In the right pane, reset the original value, if known:

"DoNotAllowXPSP2" = "1"


Navigate to the subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\OLE


In the right pane, reset the original value, if known:

"EnableDCOM" = "N"


Exit the Registry Editor.


5. To reenable the SharedAccess service (Windows 2000/XP only)
The SharedAccess service is responsible for maintaining Internet Connection Sharing and the Windows Firewall/Internet Connection Firewall applications in Windows. (The presence and names of these applications vary depending on the operating system and service pack you are using.) To protect your computer and maintain network functionality, re-enable this service if you are using any of these programs.


Windows XP Service Pack 2
If you are running Windows XP with Service Pack 2 and are using the Windows Firewall, the operating system will alert you when the SharedAccess service is stopped, by displaying an alert balloon saying that your Firewall status is unknown. Perform the following steps to ensure that the Windows Firewall is re-enabled:

Click Start > Control Panel.


Double-click the Security Center.


Ensure that the Firewall security essential is marked ON.

Note: If the Firewall security essential is marked on, your Windows Firewall is on and you do not need to continue with these steps.

If the Firewall security essential is not marked on, click the "Recommendations" button.


Under "Recommendations," click Enable Now. A window appears telling you that the Windows Firewall was successfully turned on.


Click Close, and then click OK.


Close the Security Center.


Windows 2000 or Windows XP Service Pack 1 or earlier
Complete the following steps to re-enable the SharedAccess service:

Click Start > Run.
Type services.msc

Then click OK.


Do one of the following:

Windows 2000: Under the Name column, locate the "Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)" service and double-click it.
Windows XP: Under the Named column, locate the "Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) / Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)" service and double-click it.


Under "Startup Type:", select "Automatic" from the drop-down menu.


Under "Service Status:", click the Start button.


Once the service has completed starting, click OK.


Close the Services window.
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  #4  
Old 12-20-2005, 07:03 PM
thatpfunk thatpfunk is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9
Default Re: My netller account was hacked (virus question)

tyvm GM
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  #5  
Old 12-20-2005, 08:36 PM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: My netller account was hacked (virus question)

Wow man, thats scary. In a few days I will have a computer only for poker and neteller. I don't even think I will check my email on it. Thanks for the heads up, I think everyone should be more careful with this stuff. I was actually suprised I havn't seen too many posts like this.
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  #6  
Old 12-21-2005, 01:58 AM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: My netller account was hacked (virus question)

Someone tried to deposit into FULL Tilt poker using my neteller. It was declined and I had to change my passwoard and secure ID. This happened a few weeks ago.
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  #7  
Old 12-21-2005, 12:41 PM
AA suited AA suited is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 14
Default Re: My netller account was hacked (virus question)

[ QUOTE ]
Last week I hadn't used neteller for a few days. On friday evening I attempted to log in and it said my account had been closed due to security reasons.

I give them a call today and start talking to security personel. They ask me about the last transaction I can remember. I tell them and they ask if I remember depositing $1000 with a credit card last Wed. I tell them no. They ask me for the last 4 digits of my CC. It doesn't match.

They explain that most likely my account was hacked using a virus that tracked my keystrokes. The credit card used to deposit was stolen but they were not able to make any merchant purchases before the account was frozen.

The security guy explains that most likely it was a variation of a virus called MYTOB. Now, keep in mind, I have a 2 week old laptop with all the current virus-stuff, firewlls, etc.

I am honestly pretty freaked right now. I did not think this could happen so easily. I'm at a loss for words. I do not want to open up another neteller. If anyone has any info about the virus or something like this, please give me as much info as possible, I will update when my head is more clear.

[/ QUOTE ]

wait... someone tried to DEPOSIT INTO your acct?

i dont get it? why would a hacker try to deposit $ instead of withdrawing? [img]/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]
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  #8  
Old 12-21-2005, 12:45 PM
dlk9s dlk9s is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 130
Default Re: My netller account was hacked (virus question)

[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
Last week I hadn't used neteller for a few days. On friday evening I attempted to log in and it said my account had been closed due to security reasons.

I give them a call today and start talking to security personel. They ask me about the last transaction I can remember. I tell them and they ask if I remember depositing $1000 with a credit card last Wed. I tell them no. They ask me for the last 4 digits of my CC. It doesn't match.

They explain that most likely my account was hacked using a virus that tracked my keystrokes. The credit card used to deposit was stolen but they were not able to make any merchant purchases before the account was frozen.

The security guy explains that most likely it was a variation of a virus called MYTOB. Now, keep in mind, I have a 2 week old laptop with all the current virus-stuff, firewlls, etc.

I am honestly pretty freaked right now. I did not think this could happen so easily. I'm at a loss for words. I do not want to open up another neteller. If anyone has any info about the virus or something like this, please give me as much info as possible, I will update when my head is more clear.

[/ QUOTE ]

wait... someone tried to DEPOSIT INTO your acct?

i dont get it? why would a hacker try to deposit $ instead of withdrawing? [img]/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]

[/ QUOTE ]

Maybe he was trying to disguise his hacking - make it look more legit by making a deposit before withdrawing. Plus, if it was a stolen credit card, it could be a way for the hacker to get cash, rather than just using the card to buy stuff.

I don't know, just a guess.
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  #9  
Old 12-21-2005, 04:15 PM
CanIPlay CanIPlay is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 25
Default Re: My netller account was hacked (virus question)

I went to my bank site and something popped up and Mcafee.com deleted it. This is scary.
Mcafee.com is a good service IMHO.
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  #10  
Old 12-22-2005, 01:04 AM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: My netller account was hacked (virus question)

I'm the person Wynton referred to at ITH that has had thi shappen as recently as 12/14. It's very disturbing. I just posted there what had happened as of today, but I will cross post here:

So, today is Wednesday. Despite a stomach virus which had plagued me Sunday through Tuesday, I was eagerly awaiting NETeller to contact me on Monday morning. No call, no email. Tuesday, same story, no contact. Got my wife off to the airport today and came home.

1) Logged on, and checked my email. No email from NETeller. Logged into my bank account and noticed a $31 Non Sufficient Fund at my bank. Finished breakfast, went to the bank where my suspicions were confirmed. NETeller's pending $1633.50 withdrawal [$1500 capital, $133.50 finance charge], had attempted to gain it from my bank account. Convinced the service person to waive the NSF.
2) Went to the Police Office. Filed a fraudulent case.
3) Returned home and called NETeller. First Security person I talked to couldn't handle my questions so she transferred me to her Supervisor. I asked him how the fraudulent case was coming, and he said he would put "Security" in touch with me as soon as possible.
4) An hour passes, and I get a "Security" person calling me. Asking me all the details, we go over my transaction history for the week leading up to the "incident". He basically tells me that his authority is limited and that I should bring this matter up with Aloha Casino. :shock: Hello? WTF have you been doing for a week, other than hoping that the transaction will go through and your collective asses would be covered?
5) I go back to my bank and close the account. I'll be damned if I'll let NETeller bilk me and my wife out of $1500 when her work check hits the bank this week. Since we had two checking accounts, this was easily done.

Here is where I am at now:

1) NETeller needs to revisit its policies. Allowing instaCASH without proof of funds, opens itself and its clients up to fraud like I experienced. Allowing immediate use of said funds prior to confirmation is ridiculous considering how many thievery-minded people are preying on the internet.
2) NETeller told me in uncompromising terms today, that unless they could get their money back from Aloha Casino, I am liable. Read the fine print. They aren't a bank or credit card company and if you get frauded, tough. It's your fault.
3) I am convinced that NETeller has no real security department. It seems apparent that their investigative support is another company who may or may not treat NETeller with priority.
4) I was appalled when this "Security" person told me to get in touch with Aloha Casino and do my own investigating because basically his hands were tied. What's next? Is it time for me to start my own investigation of who robbed the corner liquor store two days ago?
5) Back in February, when I signed up for Victory Poker through NETeller, I made a NETeller withdrawal for $300. It immediately showed up in my Victory Poker account. It was NEVER debited from NETeller. I got in touch with Victory, asking why I was being allowed to play with the $300, when they hadn't gotten the money from NETeller. They assured me they had. I conracted NETeller and asked them why they didn't send the $300 to Victory. They told me that no such vendor had requested funds from my account. It had to come from somewhere. Probably someone elses account. What I am getting at is it is a wholly plausibllity that someone who had legitimately tried to instaCASH $1500 into Aloha Casino did so at my expense. How would NETeller ever know?
6) Itís also plausible that someone stole the info either through my computer or from another site. Although nothing else has occurred via my computer. A little background info tells me that Aloha POKER is a Pokerroom skin and this occurred a few days after my last transaction, a Pokerroom reload.

So where am I heading?

I opened a new bank account in another bank company last Thursday in the hopes that NETeller would resolve the issue and I could change my account info and link it to the new bank account. I also was going to cancel instaCASH completely. Things aren't looking optimistically. I think my ties with NETeller will be severed completely.

I reopened my FirePay account. I put in a request with FirePay to change my bank accounts. Hopefully this will be accomplished tomorrow. I looked at my pokersites, and it is apparent that all but four of my pokersites that I play at support FirePay.

Party allows deposits, but they have no FirePay withdrawal option. I could alleviate this with iGMPay. Littlewoods, TotalBet and UKBetting don't have FirePay. Monthly bonuses at these should see a steady increase in my bankroll there, but if I go on a downturn, I may have to abandon them considering they only handle NETeller, Credit Card, Debit Card and Check.

Without access to a NETeller-type company, bonus chasing will become problematic.

So, I ask the following questions:

1) What are FirePay and iGMPay like? Probably not as quick as NETeller, and definitely not as rich in Poker clients, but how do they handle moving poker money around.
2) Do they have an instaCASH-type option? I hope not. I donít need it.
3) What are the cashout and cashin speeds both to poker sites and to bank accounts like for both iGMPay and FirePay?
4) What are the fees for both?

If a combination of FirePay and iGMPay will get me back on track, I think I will be going this route. I also, will never leave money in any of these e-wallets unless I am gearing up for a reload or sign-up bonus.
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