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  #1  
Old 12-16-2005, 06:36 PM
dozer dozer is offline
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Default Feeling like everyone is bluffing me.

Since I moved up to 3/6 from 2/4, the aggression level is much higher and the players seem to bluff and semi-bluff much more frequently. I find myself calling down a lot more with Ace high hands and mid or bottom pair in Headsup situations. Is this normal or a huge leak?
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Old 12-16-2005, 06:39 PM
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Default Re: Feeling like everyone is bluffing me.

I think it's safe to say that calling down with crap is a huge leak.
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  #3  
Old 12-16-2005, 06:44 PM
dozer dozer is offline
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Default Re: Feeling like everyone is bluffing me.

[ QUOTE ]
I think it's safe to say that calling down with crap is a huge leak.

[/ QUOTE ]

So you never call down with ace high or a pair against aggressive opponents in HU situations?

It's not like I am calling down with Ace high on a terrible board in multi way pots.
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Old 12-16-2005, 06:55 PM
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Default Re: Feeling like everyone is bluffing me.

If players have facial hair they bluff much more frequently.
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Old 12-16-2005, 06:56 PM
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Default Re: Feeling like everyone is bluffing me.

[ QUOTE ]
Is this normal or a huge leak?

[/ QUOTE ]
If you have a read that says your opponent frequently shows down crap, you see a betting pattern that says it's happening now, AND you have SOMETHING with a good chance to improve to the best hand after the flop, by all means hang in.

If you have no reads and only Ace-blank offsuit, huge leak.

And the leak is magnified at full ring, where there's a good chance that whoever you're up against is the guy who has a PP or flopped a card or two. Don't pay off because of what you think your opponent's doing. Pay off because the facts you have say you have a good chance to win.

Tossing AQ vs. a LAG in a tiny HU pot is not a sin - even after the turn or river - he'll pay you off plenty to make up for it when you DO have something.
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  #6  
Old 12-16-2005, 07:56 PM
TripleH68 TripleH68 is offline
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Default Re: Feeling like everyone is bluffing me.

Feeling like everyone is bluffing you is a common form of tilt.
And it can be costly.
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  #7  
Old 12-16-2005, 08:16 PM
Harv72b Harv72b is offline
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Default Re: Feeling like everyone is bluffing me.

This is both normal and a pretty big leak. It's something you'll adjust to over time, but in the meantime:

-Pay attention to which players at your table are bluffing & semibluffing most often. Just as importantly, pay attention to who the passive ones are. When a passive player raises you, you don't have any business seeing a showdown with A high.

-Respect turn raises. There are players who will bluff at the turn, especially if the pot is heads up. But unless you have personally seen that particular player make that move before, you're better off giving him the benefit of the doubt and folding. Unless of course the pot odds dictate continuing with the hand.

-Don't bluff at calling stations. They'll happily give you free cards all night long, and they'll never, ever fold a pair. If you find yourself on the river with AK UI vs. a calling station, either check through or check/fold.

-Remember that no hand "deserves" to win. Just because you're dealt KK and the guy who called your raise preflop has a 98 VPIP doesn't mean that he didn't hit the ace that flopped when he bets into you. No amount of betting, raising, or otherwise trying to steamroller your opponents is going to change the times that you get outflopped (or outturned, or outrivered). If anything, refusing to give up on your strong preflop hands will get you sucked out on more often, because your opponents will see that you're "unlucky" or "a maniac" and stop folding to your raises preflop (note that this isn't always a bad thing, but you have to adjust your play in order to take advantage of it).
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  #8  
Old 12-16-2005, 08:35 PM
dozer dozer is offline
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Default Re: Feeling like everyone is bluffing me.

Thanks everyone who gave good advice,
It will help me think better at the tables and stay focused instead of letting myself go on tilt and become a calling station in the wrong situations and against the wrong players.
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  #9  
Old 12-17-2005, 04:30 PM
nomadtla nomadtla is offline
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Default Re: Feeling like everyone is bluffing me.

[ QUOTE ]
This is both normal and a pretty big leak. It's something you'll adjust to over time, but in the meantime:

-Pay attention to which players at your table are bluffing & semibluffing most often. Just as importantly, pay attention to who the passive ones are. When a passive player raises you, you don't have any business seeing a showdown with A high.

-Respect turn raises. There are players who will bluff at the turn, especially if the pot is heads up. But unless you have personally seen that particular player make that move before, you're better off giving him the benefit of the doubt and folding. Unless of course the pot odds dictate continuing with the hand.

-Don't bluff at calling stations. They'll happily give you free cards all night long, and they'll never, ever fold a pair. If you find yourself on the river with AK UI vs. a calling station, either check through or check/fold.

-Remember that no hand "deserves" to win. Just because you're dealt KK and the guy who called your raise preflop has a 98 VPIP doesn't mean that he didn't hit the ace that flopped when he bets into you. No amount of betting, raising, or otherwise trying to steamroller your opponents is going to change the times that you get outflopped (or outturned, or outrivered). If anything, refusing to give up on your strong preflop hands will get you sucked out on more often, because your opponents will see that you're "unlucky" or "a maniac" and stop folding to your raises preflop (note that this isn't always a bad thing, but you have to adjust your play in order to take advantage of it).

[/ QUOTE ]

I think this should be printed out and posted by every 2+2 limit players computer. This is gold Harv. I need to memorize this cause I have the same problem as OP and it's whats holding me in lower levels.
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